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Quantitative sensory tests and prediction of early onset chronic pain - project description

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This study will explore whether QST measures of pain sensitivity among 15-16 year olds are predictive of new-onset pain assessed two years later.


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Summary

Pediatric pain is an important public health issue, affecting 11–44% of the pediatric population. Children with pain may experience poorer psychosocial functioning, decreased levels of physical activity, higher rates of sleep disturbances, and higher levels of school absenteeism. Ultimately, this may result in poorer quality of life, long term disability, and financial impact. Identification of risk factors for the development of chronic pain has drawn from biopsychosocial models of pain. The use of psychophysical pain procedures such as Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) provides physical correlates by incorporating sensory nervous system assessment. To date, very limited research on QST is available in pediatric populations. Thus the aim of this study is to explore whether QST measures of pain sensitivity among 15-16 year olds are predictive of new-onset pain assessed two years later.

See the full project description at Cristin for more information about results, researchers, contact information etc.

Project participants

Project leader

Christopher Sivert Nielsen, Norwegian Institute of Public Health

Project participants

Ellina Iordanova Schistad, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Oslo University Hospital
Bo Lars Engdahl, Avdeling for kroniske sykdommer og aldring, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Olöf Anna Steingrimsdottir, Avdeling for kroniske sykdommer og aldring, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Audun Stubhaug, Department of Anesthesiology, Oslo University Hospital
Arnoldo Frigessi Di Rattalma, Department of Biostatistics, University of Oslo
Bente Evy Halvorsen, Research Institute for Internal Medicine, University of Oslo
Birgitte Freiesleben de Blasio, Avdeling for infeksjonsepidemiologi og modellering, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Anne-Sofie Furberg, Kroniske sykdommers epidemiologi, UiT The Arctic University of Norway
Solveig Engebretsen, Department of Biostatistics, University of Oslo
Torsten Gordh, Uppsala University
Emmanuel Bäckryd, Sweden
Tonya Palermo, University of Washington
See Tham, University of Washington
Raul Primiceiro, Norges Arktiske Universitet, UiT The Arctic University of Norway
Sinead Holden, Aalborg University